anafieldelaunay:

history in my bones; a secrets rich and strange mix for the old cities
[listen]
i. Kajiura Yuki; M07+M08 ii. Apocalyptica; Beautiful iii. Conner Youngblood; The Warpath iv. Sun Kil Moon; Heron Blue v. Blue Foundation; Ricochet vi. Thom Yorke; Hearing Damage vii. The Chromatics; Tick of the Clock viii. Young The Giant/The xx; Islands/Intro ix. Kajiura Yuki; M02 x. Florence + the Machine; Remain Nameless xi. Trevor Yuile; Endless Forms Most Beautiful

anafieldelaunay:

history in my bones; a secrets rich and strange mix for the old cities

[listen]

i. Kajiura Yuki; M07+M08 ii. Apocalyptica; Beautiful iii. Conner Youngblood; The Warpath iv. Sun Kil Moon; Heron Blue v. Blue Foundation; Ricochet vi. Thom Yorke; Hearing Damage vii. The Chromatics; Tick of the Clock viii. Young The Giant/The xx; Islands/Intro ix. Kajiura Yuki; M02 x. Florence + the Machine; Remain Nameless xi. Trevor Yuile; Endless Forms Most Beautiful

Anonymous asked:

hello ciar! i must ask: have you written the modern gods poems yourself? they are absolutely breathtaking, all of them.

you mean the little bits of writing attached to my picture sets? yes, i write them all myself! it’s the final step in making each set.

themyskira:

mythology meme » 1/1 mythology » Irish
Ireland’s native mythology did not entirely survive the country’s conversion to Christianity. However, many Irish legends were preserved in medieval literature — albeit stripped of their religious meaning — and the surviving manuscripts represent the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology.Irish mythology is generally divided into four overlapping cycles: the Mythological Cycle, encompassing the origins of the Irish people and the settlement of Ireland; the Ulster Cycle, an age of warrior heroes such as Cú Chulainn and Conchobar; the Fenian Cycle, following the exploits of Fionn mac Cumhaill and his band of men, the Fianna; and the Historical Cycle, dealing with the genealogies of historical Irish kings.Notable Irish tales include the Táin Bó Cúailgne (the Cattle Raid of Cooley), the Togail Bruidne Dá Derga (the Destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel), the Tóraigheacht Dhiarmada agus Ghráinne (the Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne) and the Tochmarc Étaíne (the Wooing of Étain).

themyskira:

mythology meme » 1/1 mythology » Irish

Ireland’s native mythology did not entirely survive the country’s conversion to Christianity. However, many Irish legends were preserved in medieval literature — albeit stripped of their religious meaning — and the surviving manuscripts represent the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology.

Irish mythology is generally divided into four overlapping cycles: the Mythological Cycle, encompassing the origins of the Irish people and the settlement of Ireland; the Ulster Cycle, an age of warrior heroes such as Cú Chulainn and Conchobar; the Fenian Cycle, following the exploits of Fionn mac Cumhaill and his band of men, the Fianna; and the Historical Cycle, dealing with the genealogies of historical Irish kings.

Notable Irish tales include the Táin Bó Cúailgne (the Cattle Raid of Cooley), the Togail Bruidne Dá Derga (the Destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel), the Tóraigheacht Dhiarmada agus Ghráinne (the Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne) and the Tochmarc Étaíne (the Wooing of Étain).

themyskira:

mythology meme » 1/1 epic » The Táin Bó Cúailnge

The Táin Bó Cúailnge, or the Cattle Raid of Cooley, is the central epic of the Irish Ulster Cycle. It tells of a war against Ulster, led by Queen Medb of Connacht and her husband Ailill, who intend to steal the stud bull Donn Cuailnge. The Ulstermen have been rendered helpless due to the curse of the goddess Macha, who has condemned them for nine generations to suffer debilitating pains in their times of greatest difficulty, and only the teenage Cúchulainn is capable of fighting back.

Gifted with supernatural strength and skill, Cúchulainn single-handledly takes on the armies of Connacht, devastating their ranks, but at great personal cost. Medb is ultimately forced to order a retreat, and although she succeeds in taking the bull, it dies soon after she brings it back to Connacht.

(via thewanderingcelt)

“Monster" is derived from the Latin noun monstrum, "divine portent," itself formed on the root of the verb monere, "to warn." It came to refer to living things of anomalous shape or structure, or to fabulous creatures like the sphinx who were composed of strikingly incongruous parts, because the ancients considered the appearance of such beings to be a sign of some impending supernatural event. Monsters, like angels, functioned as messengers and heralds of the extraordinary. They served to announce impending revelation, saying, in effect, "Pay attention; something of profound importance is happening.”

- My Words to Victor Frankenstein: by Susan Stryker (via whatmonstrosity)

(via pumpkinskull)

anafieldelaunay:

Secrets Rich and Strange: The Old Cities

Their time for revelry has past. They carry on their backs the weight of generations, with scars that run to the bone. Their memories are long and their words guarded and measured. They are gods of stone and brick and mortar, their hearts weary and full of secrets. If you ask them a question, they will answer only in riddles.

anafieldelaunay:

Secrets Rich and Strange: The Old Cities

Their time for revelry has past. They carry on their backs the weight of generations, with scars that run to the bone. Their memories are long and their words guarded and measured. They are gods of stone and brick and mortar, their hearts weary and full of secrets. If you ask them a question, they will answer only in riddles.

(via dark-vowelled)

betnhe asked:

I saw your answer earlier on the topic of the Wild Hunt. I have never come across a version led by Nuada before. Could you tell me more about that please, where you got that from?

nothing so specific, i’m afraid—i’ve just seen occasional reference to nuada as one of the wild hunt leaders occasionally cited in ireland. a reference on wikipedia suggests the fairies in english tradition and literature by k. m. briggs as a source, so you could check that out if you can find a copy. my personal interactions with the wild hunt have largely been with manannán mac lir as their leader, or with individual members of the hunt.

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