theantidote:

The Blackberry Bramble
Ingredients:
1 1/2 oz gin
3/4 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz simple syrup
3/4 crème de mûre
blackberries for garnish
Start by adding crushed ice to your rocks glass. Fill about halfway.
Next, simply add the gin, lemon juice, and simple syrup. Stir well to combine.
Top off your glass with more crushed ice, then slowly/carefully add the crème de mûre.
Garnish with a few plump ripe blackberries and serve!

theantidote:

The Blackberry Bramble

Ingredients:

Start by adding crushed ice to your rocks glass. Fill about halfway.

Next, simply add the gin, lemon juice, and simple syrup. Stir well to combine.

Top off your glass with more crushed ice, then slowly/carefully add the crème de mûre.

Garnish with a few plump ripe blackberries and serve!

(via heathenwoods)

asylum-art:

The Eerie Beauty Of Crimea’s Abandoned Soviet-Era Salt Mine Might

Crimeans call it Sivash, or the “Rotten Sea,” in reference to the unpleasant smell that wafts from the network of shallow, salty lagoons. But for those willing to look past the stench, an otherworldly vista awaits.

Sergey Anashkevych, a photographer in the region, has captured jaw-dropping photos of the marshy area, which includes an abandoned Soviet-era salt mine. According to Caters News Agency, in some spots, the water takes on a deep crimson hue as a result of halobacteria, single-celled microorganisms that are purple in color and found in highly salty

(via pumpkinskull)

it sounds facetious but i’m genuinely touched.

kudos to spiceytime and eddyckeane for collectively being ninety-five of my notes in the last twenty-four hours.

girlsarewolves:

she’ll eat you alive
(a mix for girls who’d rather devour you than love you)

how to be eaten by a woman the glitch mob // sleep alone (909 in the darktimes mix) bat for lashes // supermassive black hole muse // razor sharp collide // daughters of darkness halestorm // bad intentions (easy girl mix) digital daggers // witch belly // le disko shiny toy guns // how to be a heart breaker marina and the diamonds // vermillion slipknot // hunter bjork // venus in furs the velvet underground // the deep data romance // head over heels digital daggers // #1 crush (gothic mix) garbage // dangerous kind the rasmus // beneath the skin collide // choke jack off jill // siren song bat for lashes // bubblegum bitch marina and the diamonds // raining blood tori amos // after dark tito and tarantula // killer and a queen stella katsoudas & geno lenardo // bad romance halestorm // beautiful monster neyo // the devil within digital daggers 

listen

girlsarewolves:

she’ll eat you alive

(a mix for girls who’d rather devour you than love you)

how to be eaten by a woman the glitch mob // sleep alone (909 in the darktimes mix) bat for lashes // supermassive black hole muse // razor sharp collide // daughters of darkness halestorm // bad intentions (easy girl mix) digital daggers // witch belly // le disko shiny toy guns // how to be a heart breaker marina and the diamonds // vermillion slipknot // hunter bjork // venus in furs the velvet underground // the deep data romance // head over heels digital daggers // #1 crush (gothic mix) garbage // dangerous kind the rasmus // beneath the skin collide // choke jack off jill // siren song bat for lashes // bubblegum bitch marina and the diamonds // raining blood tori amos // after dark tito and tarantula // killer and a queen stella katsoudas & geno lenardo // bad romance halestorm // beautiful monster neyo // the devil within digital daggers 

listen

(via agentmaineofficial)

Anonymous asked:

Your blog is amazing and inspiring. I love it.

that’s very sweet, anon! i’m glad to inspire you. i hope you enjoy your stay.

Anonymous asked:

How do you deal with the longing? The urge to run away with Them when you can't? How do you deal with the ache that you want to be more of what They are than what you have to be? I'm sorry... I shouldn't ask but I need to know. I need... someone else's words to feel not so stranded...

i wrap myself up in things that remind me of who i am, and take comfort in them. there’s a reason this blog has a faery recipe catalogue of almost one hundred posts. there’s a reason i’m steadily working my way through them. i have fairy lights wrapped around my headboard and a neighbourhood that backs onto a waterfront park when i need to run. when i get restless and feel like i’m going to claw my way out of my human skin if i don’t do something—i do something.

i don’t think i’m ever going to feel like i’m completely whole and where i ought to be. not in this life, at least. maybe in the next. but i find if you do what you can to bring that other life into yours, instead of trying to escape your life to something else… it’s easier. healthier. a better balance.

find the things that make you feel at home and wrap yourself up in them.

darkbeautymag:

More Images: http://bit.ly/1lVQdGO
Photographer: Fabio InterraHair/Makeup: Stefania GilardiAssistant: Valerio FrigerioModel: Martina Campanelli

darkbeautymag:

More Images: http://bit.ly/1lVQdGO

Photographer: Fabio Interra
Hair/Makeup: Stefania Gilardi
Assistant: Valerio Frigerio
Model: Martina Campanelli

(via felicitymay)

intrinnsic asked:

Are there any Celtic deities (particularly goddesses) of storms? I have a very strong connection to storms but haven't been able to find any information.

reviewingtheceltics:

The Gaulish god Taranis is the most clearly linked with thunderstorms. The connection is recorded by the Romans as well as being clearly recognizable etymologically. However, being Gaulish, very little is known about his place in the myths and his other associations. I’ve heard of the possibility of an etymological link between him and Tuireann, a seemingly minor figure in Irish mythology, but there’s not enough to say with any confidence that there is any connection. There may be more substantial links to deities in Welsh or Breton mythology that I’m not aware of.

The Irish god Lugh is often associated with lightning and storms as well, with his name being a possible etymological link to the Indo-European root meaning “light,” suggesting lightning. The epithet “Lamhfada,” meaning “Long-Armed” and implying great skill with the spear and/or the sling, seems to back up this theory. Some polytheists who work with Lugh accept this connection, some do not. His Welsh equivalent is Lleu Llaw Gyfes, and I expect the same etymological connection could apply, but I’m less than certain.

— Korrigan

I honestly couldn’t tell you where I remember seeing it before but I’m confident in saying that Manannan mac Lir has associations with storms as well.

— Artificer

The Cailleach is an oddly specific goddess who could be associated with storms. More formally, she’s a creatrix credited with the physical formations of the land as well as the bringer and Queen of Winter, though her process of bringing Winter to the land is often by the vehicle of fantastic storms caused by the washing of her laundry in the ocean.

There are also creatures known as Storm Hags with similarly coganated names so she would not, personally, be a far stretch for a storm associated goddess.

-Wolf

i don’t remember where i heard this as well, but i can corroborate that manannán is associated with storms. i believe in part it’s weather in general (particularly mist or fog) but storms are comprised in that. manannán is also one of the recognized leaders of the wild hunt in ireland, and the wild hunt have clear and blatant storm associations.

i know donn is also connected with storms, particularly violent storms at sea, as he was drowned in such a storm and later credited for causing shipwrecks. one of the epithets i have taken to using for him is “ship-breaker.”

my personal belief is that the storms connected with manannán have a more playful feel, while donn’s storms are sombre and intended to challenge those who are caught in them—but that’s entirely upg (if one that fellow manannán or donn devotees have felt sympathetic to).

Anonymous asked:

Sorry to bother, but do you know anything of Crom Dubh? I've done my own research but I like second opinions.

my apologies, anon, but i honestly don’t know much at all. i know there are some folk traditions surrounding crom dubh, and that he may or may not be the same figure as crom cruach, but aside from what is written about him (them?) from the stories surrounding st. patrick’s life, i don’t believe there’s much in the way of literary evidence of him. patrick himself did not write about him. he’s not one of the tuatha dé danann, he doesn’t show up in aos sí legends, he doesn’t make any appearances in pre-medieval literature. since that’s largely my area of focus, i tend not to pay him much mind.

it’s possible that his story as told by christian commentators was originally less major folklore that was then expanded into something larger and more menacing in order to give st. patrick an enemy or an idol to fight against. i don’t know. i do know that though crom cruach is often seen as a death god, i have never felt any particular pull or interest in worshipping him, and i started my religious journey as an irish polytheist death worshipper. does that actually mean anything? maybe not, but it’s there.

if any of my followers have any additional input on crom dubh or crom cruach (or an opinion on whether they’re the same figure) please feel free to pass it along. i’ll also take a look in james mackillop’s book when i get the chance and see what he has to say on the subject. best of luck, anon!

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